2.23.2017

D+

Sometimes you do things even when you know it's not the best decision. Most of the stuff in this picture comes with no ethical labor standards or eco brags attached to it. (Aside from being animal-free. Which, granted, is my #1 requirement, but still.) I did get the navy anchor scarf secondhand in Vancouver but that's about it.

The coat? An acrylic sweatshop car coat I bought on my way between appointments one cold, blustery, under-dressed day, even after I'd read about plastic fibers in our waterways due to washing. It ticked all the boxes of what I wanted and had been looking for and I was freezing that day. I wear it a lot.

And my ubiquitous black jeans are BDG - previous versions I had were made in the USA but then they switched manufacturing. However, I knew they worked for me and I wear them so frequently that I just kept replacing them with the same exact brand and the same exact cut.

Sauconys? Helpful when I was in treatment for PF and have a lot of vegan options. I know they work and I don't need to worry about breaking them in or whether they work for my feet. I know they will work. I've been wearing this brand for about 20 years now.

Polarized Polaroid sunglasses? Impulse buy at the eye doctor. Previously a pair of found polarized Ray-Bans impressed me enough with their polarization but the giant scratch in them tested both my patience and eyesight so I stopped wearing them. When I saw these, I picked them up and we've been together ever since. (I also have some promo sunglasses that I wear from time to time as well.) 

These are the kind of buys I'm more at peace with these days, though they make me feel a little defeated and embarrassed given that I have the means to try better. I will work on finding replacements for the jeans and the sneakers at some point (I've been through a bunch of jeans and sneakers already to no avail). But I also hope that I'll wear these all to death and hopefully that will be years from now. 



5 comments:

  1. Understood. I often feel a little trapped when I SHOULD buy the most ethical, least harmful thing, but don't really like or want that thing.

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    1. Well, also when you buy that thing that's at least marginally better and it doesn't work out for you. I feel like I've tried to go back to US-made American Apparel jeans and the finish on them was like fuzzy cotton that picked up every piece of lint in the world so I had to get rid of them and went back to the BDGs anyway. I try to only buy jeans I can try on so that's a little limiting as well, and makes me much less likely to drop bucks on an online purchase. At some point it's like okay one new pair of BDGs every year/year and a half that get constant usage is maybe better than 3-4 new pairs of other jeans I will try to wear but won't work and I'll go back to BDG anyway.

      I've tried resale jeans but that's a lesson in both patience and humor.

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    2. I may give up on jeans entirely.

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  2. Oh goodness. These seem pretty good to me for the reason that you love them and plan to wear them to death. I have a stack of things I bought that are good on paper but had issues in real life - sustainably-made things that fell apart in the wash or shrunk radically, ethically-produced things that are so friggin' unflattering as to be useless in real life for me. I have things from Target and Old Navy and Forever 21 (yikes) I've purchased because they work well for me that have held up shockingly well (my favorite example was a pretty little white linen jacket that I bought from a clearance rack and wore for 3-4 years for work until it yellowed beyond repair). I love my $30 Icebreaker undies the most, but their thongs are terrible -- Victoria's Secret has served me much better in that department.

    Better is better. Sometime slowing fast-fashion down has value, too. And having something like your shoes/jeans that still works and hasn't changed so much that it stopped working? That's wonderful. I used to buy only J Crew suiting because it fit like a dream and held up really well. Now? The fit is atrocious and finding a pair of suiting pants with lining has become a nightmare. I haven't found a replacement I'm fully happy with and dread wearing a suit for work (and avoid it as much as possible) since.

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    1. "I have a stack of things I bought that are good on paper but had issues in real life - sustainably-made things that fell apart in the wash or shrunk radically, ethically-produced things that are so friggin' unflattering as to be useless in real life for me."

      Yes to both! I ordered a pair of ethically produced vegan shoes recently... but they were uncomfortable and a much different color than I expected, so I had to send them back.

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